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Full text of "The Pine Knot"

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JAMES T. LAVVSON 
Editor-in-Chief 

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Clem M. Banks 
Business Manager 

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We have attempted to 
picture in this volume the 
past year at A. C. C, and 
we feel that our efforts 
have not been in vain if. in 
after years, you turn back 
these pages and recall the 
pleasant memories of our 
sojourn here. 

The Editor. 








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STAFF 



James T. Lavvson 
Editor-in-Chief 



Clem M. Banks 
Business Manager 



John E. Croom 
Assistant Editor 



J. Robert Grady 

Ass(sfan( Business Manager 



Copyright 1922, Cincinnati Coffin Co. 



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CIJC 1928 




Pine Knot 
















Mrs. H. L. Coward 


































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TO 

MRS. H. L. COWARD 

A STEADFAST FRIEND OF THE COLLEGE AND ONE 

WHO IS LARGELY ASSISTING IN MAKING 

POSSIBLE ITS FUTURE, 

WE DEDICATE THIS 

THE PINE KNOT OF 1928 



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A clinging spirit of pure delight 

In evening shadows and morning glow, 
Fill each heart with unbounded love 

As in thy portals we come and go. 

Fond memories live for thy love and care, 
And in unison our praises ever ascend; 

To thee our hearts forever sing — 
Hail! Hail! Thou maker of men: 
The College 



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President Howard S. Hilley 









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HOWARD STEVEN HILLEY 









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H. S. Hilley . the man who since 1920 has earnestly endeavored to guide 
the college toward the fuller realization of the founders' dreams, brought to 
this young institution all the boundless energies of youth, together with the 
genuine enthusiasm of a man who works for a cause which he believes is worthy 
of his very life. To such a man, simple in manner and dress, but ever keenly 
alert to the responsibilities of his position, the people of the state and the stu- 
dents of Atlantic Christian College owe much. 

Under his guidance during the past years the school has moved from the 
"prep'' school class to that of a full grown college with all the future possi- 
bilities of such institutions. This great advance has been due, in no small 
measure, to the executive ability of a scholar who has always kept his feet on 
firm ground, even though his head was wrapped in the clouds of the future. 
His idealism has not taken him beyond the group but has made of him a greater 
force within the group. The deserving student finds in him a loyal and true 
friend, who believes in the worth of investments made in Christian character. 



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FACULTY 

Howard S. Hilley 
President 

Fredrick F. Grim 
Dean and Professor of Education 

A.B., Drake University; A.M., Bethany College; Graduate Student Drake University, University 
of Chicago: A.M., Columbia University 

Francis F. Harper 
Professor of Mathematics and Physics 

A.B., Atlantic Christian College: Graduate Student Columbia University 

Mrs. H. M. Stoll 
Professor of Modern Languages 

A.B., A.M.. University of Illinois 

C. H. Hamlin 
Professor of Social Science 

A.B.. William and Mary: A.M.. University of Virginia 

J. Watson Shockley 

Professor of Religion 

A.B., A.M.. and B.D., Texas Christian University: M.R.E., Boston University School 

of Religious Education and Social Service 

B. G. Carson 

Professor of Science 

A.B., A.M., Ph.D.. University of North Carolina 

CORTELL K. HOLSAPPLE 
Professor of English 

A.M., Austin College: B.D.. Drake University 
Page Twelve 






























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Mrs. Ed. R. Tweddale 
Instructor in English and Commercial Subjects 

Ivy Mae Smith 
Professor of Piano 

B. Mus., Indiana University; Pupil. Leo Sampaix. Columbia University. Fontainblcau 

Cecil Hodam 
Professor of Voice 

Mamie Jennings Lucas 
Instructor in Expression 

B.S.. Lebanon College; Graduate Student Vanderbilt University School of Expression and 
Student Emerson College of Oratory 

R. M. McGiRT 
Instructor in Physics 

A.B.. Davidson College 

Edward R. Tweddale 
Coach and Instructor in Physical Education 

Eureka College 

Thomas Grant Leary 
Student Assistant in Chemistry 









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Ethel Morgan 
Student Assistant in Biology 









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OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 

H. S. HlLLEY President 

F. F. GRIM Dean 

Mildred Ross Secretary 

MRS. A. R. MOORE Dean of Women 

FRANCIS HARPER Secretary of Faculty 

MYRTLE HARPER Librarian 

Mrs. Julia Ross Matron 



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HISTORY OF ATLANTIC CHRISTIAN COLLEGE 

Atlantic Christian College had its beginning in La Grange when Joseph 
Kinsey opened the Kinsey School in 1886. The school continued eleven years 
with success, and he was offered a location at Wilson. In the summer of 1897. 
under the supervision of Joseph Kinsey. the Wilson Educational Association 
erected a large building: and Kinsey Seminary opened in Wilson September. 
1897. But the Seminary continued only four sessions because of the declining 
health of President Kinsey. 

The Disciples began to consider the proposition of purchasing this property 
for the maintenance of their college. Throughout the summer and early fall 
of 1901 this was written and preached: and when the State Convention met 
at Kinston, October. 1901, plans were arranged for acquiring the Wilson prop- 
erty. Within a few weeks afterward means for financing the enterprise were 
arranged and the deed for the property was made to the "North Carolina Mis- 
sionary Convention." The Board of Trustees choose for the name of the 
school "Atlantic Christian College." In May, 1902. it was incorporated with 
J. J. Harper of Smitbfield as first chancellor. 

Page Fifteen 

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The College grew out of several attempts to establish an institution of 
higher learning which would serve them in the field of general culture and edu- 
cation, especially in the ministry and leadership of the church. The revelation 
of its history is that of the efforts of a church group that was relatively weak 
in members and financial strength to build and maintain a college. The history 
of this institution may be given in four general divisions. 

The first period may be called the period of introduction. Though there 
had been before this efforts to establish a school. Atlantic Christian College 
marks the beginning of a real college effort. With little money, meager equip- 
ment, and inadequate understanding of the task before them, the college 
authorities set up a curriculum. 

The period following the beginning was marked by slow and constructive 
growths, and these may be called the silent years. There was the change from 
the spontaneous beginning to a process of building, year after year, a foundation 
on which to rest the future work. 



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During these early years, from 1904 to 1907. J. J. Harper was president, 
and here was manifested to a high degree perseverance and conscientious devo- 
tion to a cause. Under his leadership the school grew in the confidence and 
esteem until J. C. Caldwell was called to the presidency. For nine years the vigor 
and consecration of a great soul was woven into the work. His wise leadership 
and his great faith contributed largely to the on going and the permanency of 
the work. 

Following Dr. Caldwell, came R. A. Smith of Indiana. Dr. Smith had 
been a member of the faculty during Dr. Harper's administration, and in accept- 
ing the presidency he renewed associations and interests of former years. Dr. 
Smith was a man of large vision and an untiring worker, always striving to 
advance the interests and enlarge the influence of the college. When in 1919 
he accepted a professorship in Texas Christian University. H. S. Hilley was 
acting president, and the next year was elected president. These latter years 
have been full of worthy and fruitful endeavor, and the end of silence was 

Page Seventeen 



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reached in 1922 when Atlantic Christian College was recognized as a standard 
college. 

Expansion characterizes the third period of the history of Atlantic Chris- 
tian College. This outgrowth of what has gone before marks a step in the 
field of higher education. The period is marked by four outstanding changes, 
namely: the elimination of the high school and special departments, a four 
hundred per cent increase in the student body: the growth of the endowment 
fund through the Carolina Enlargement Campaign in 1920. and the crusade 
of 1927: and a growing recognition of the work of the college, and its future 
development. The third period is ending and we are facing the fourth which 
is probably the most difficult one. What we have done in the past must be 
consolidated: and to accomplish this consolidation the amounts pledged for 
endowment must be replaced by cash, and the pledges for the building fund 



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must be collected. To complete the building program undertaken there must 
be additional funds secured. All of which necessitates the earnest cooperation 
of the Christian brotherhood. 

The graduates of Atlantic Christian College may be found filling im- 
portant positions. Steadily her young men and young women are taking their 
places in the religious, the professional, and the commercial life of our country. 
Worthy sons and daughters are her pride and her glory. It is they who are 
to make the "Habebunt Lumen Vitae" a living reality. 



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FREDRICK F. GRIM 

Professor Grim is dean of the college and professor of Education. His wholehearted 
interest in the task that is before him has won for him fame and recognition in the community 
of higher education. Through his service and efforts the college has been greatly blessed, and 
by his competency in the department with which he is identified some of the best workers have 
gone into the field of service. 

Mr. Grim is held high in the esteem and love of every one who knows him. and in him 
the student finds a real friend ready and anxious to aid them in every interest of their college 
career. We are deeply indebted to him for the many things already accomplished, and greater 
things that are to be are his to help bring about. 

It can be said of him, "His life is gentle, and the elements so mixed in him. that Nature 
might stand up and say to the world. 'This is a Man'." 



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THE BUILDER 

( Unknown ) 

An old man traveling a lone highway 

Came at the evening cold and grey 

To a chasm deep and wide. 

The old man crossed in the twilight dim 

The sullen stream had no fear for him: 

But he turned when safe on the other side 

And built a bridge to span the rushing tide. 

"Old man." said a fellow pilgrim near, 

"You are wasting your strength in building here. 

Your journey will end with the ending day, 

And you never again will pass this way. 

You've crossed the chasm deep and wide, 

And why build you the bridge at eventide?" 

The builder lifted his old grey head, 

"Good friend, in the path I've come," he said, 

"There followeth after me today 

A youth whose feet must pass this way. 

This chasm that was as naught to me 

To that fair youth a pitfall may be; 

He too must cross in the twilight dim — 

Good friend. I am building the bridge for him." 



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Mrs. A.' R. Moore 

Dean of Women 



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THE CLASS OF 1928 

The class of '28 is leaving its Alma Mater and launching out into the rides 
with an outward current flowing into the sea of the future, it is making its most 
serious adventure. This class in the fall of '24 appeared on the campus of 
Atlantic Christian College to prepare for the serious voyage. We take much 
pride in being the largest Freshman class up to that time and especially in being 
the first class to enter after the college attained its "A" grade. 

During our Freshman year there were many hardships and discourage- 
ments to be met — getting accustomed to the dormitory rules and regulations. 
The ringing of the bell often found many of us. especially the girls, wondering 
whether we had commited a crime or were supposed to attend to another duty. 
By the end of the first semester several of our group had withdrawn from 
school for various reasons — at this we were discouraged. Nevertheless we con- 
tinued to go forward to the goal of becoming Sophomores. 

After three months of freedom from rules, light bells, cramming for ex- 
aminations and "beaux" we found ourselves back again on the campus — Sopho- 
mores. Much to our grief and sorrow several from our number were missing. 
Those of us who had returned found that along with our great store of 
knowledge we had responsibilities to bear. With great pomp did we take the 
responsibility of "breaking in" the Freshmen. 

Upon entering our Junior year, we again found our ranks depleted. Sev- 
eral had discovered that they had sufficient education, and others who had more 
ambition than we had attended summer school and were able to join the class 
of '27. We were sorry to lose them but our loss meant their gain. We be- 
lieved that there was something before us that we could reap if we fainted not. 
With this in view we earnestly strove toward our Senior year of dignity. 

Our Senior year found us rejoicing to have our number increased. Now 
that we have the goal of our Freshman year in sight we feel greatly repaid for 
our much labor. Those who are anxiously waiting to make the first launch 
alone are: 








































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EUNICE AYCOCK 

LUCAMA. N. C. 

Eunice Aycock. one of our original group 
from Lucama. saw that Atlantic Christian 
College could not give her all the wisdom 
that she needed, therefore she has attended 
summer school at both N. C. C. W. and 
Asheville. Eunice has been a member of the 
Y. W. C. A. Cabinet, the production staff 
of the Dramatic Club, secretary of the Aleth- 
ian Literarv Society; she also has held sev- 
eral offices in the Sigma Tau Chi. Eunice 
is a very quiet girl, and you may be surprised 
some day to see her name in the paper as a 
noted woman of law. 



CLEM BANKS 
Arapahoe. N. C. 

Clem Banks from Arapahoe joined our 
band after being here for three years in the 
"Prep" school. Clem won the esteem of 
the faculty to the extent that they awarded 
him the "Faculty Loving Cup" for being 
the best all-around student in 1 9 2 6 - ' 2 7 . 
Clem is a charter member of Phi Kappa 
Alpha, was president of our Junior class, and 
is business manager of the PINE KNOT. 
Clem is known as one of the college relics. 



Atlantic Christian College Library 
Wilson, N. C. 

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Here's another from Arapahoe. After at- 
tending summer school at Seashore Summer 
School and E. C. T. C. Neva Jewell Banks 
was able to join us in our senior year. Neva 
has been secretary of the Athletic Association 
and vice-president of the Hesperian Literary 
Society. She is seldom heard, but we are 
confident, from her diligence toward scholas- 
tics, that she will make an excellent teacher. 



A representative from Virginia is Julia 
Belsches from Disputanta. Julia numbered 
with the class as a Freshman and has been a 
faithful member ever since. She loves to 
argue and especially with the professors. 
Julia is one who always has a word for every 
one. but few know her except by her smile. 
She does not believe in letting her looks inter- 
fere with her education. 



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MRS. L. J. BICKERS 
Deep Run, N. C. 

Although only a senior in Expression, the 
class feels highly elated in having Mrs. Blanch 
Bickers as a member of its graduating class. 
Having experienced married life for a suffi- 
cient period of time she is prepared to relate 
to the girls especially the advantages and dis- 
advantages of married life. Besides being 
with us two years at Atlantic Christian Col- 
lege. Mrs. Bickers has been in school at South 
Eastern Christian College. Auburn. Georgia: 
and at Duke University summer school. We 
are confident her career as a wife and teacher 
will be a benefit to society. 



GORDON BOSWELL 
Black Creek. N. C. 

Gordon Boswell is from Black Creek. We 
are very fortunate in having this prospective 
young doctor in our class. Gordon is a very 
quiet and settled student, and by his amiable 
manner has won the esteem of the student 
body. We cannot conceive of any student 
who is not a diligent worker working in the 
chemistry laboratory until two A. M. on 
experiments, and this he has been known to 
do. Every one who has worked with Gor- 
don has found him to be an excellent student. 









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HARVEY BROOKBANK 
STOKESDALE. N. C. 

After graduating from A. C. "Prep" 
school Harvey Brookbank of Stokesdale, be- 
came a member of our Freshman class. Har- 
vey is better known to the students and to 
himself as "Red." "Red" has the esteem 
of the student body as having executive abil- 
ity for he has been president of the Fellow- 
ship, the Alethian Literary Society, the Senior 
class, and vice-president of the Phi Kappa 
Alpha. From his record, his friendship and 
his high ideals we are fully persuaded that he 
will make a great success in the ministry for 
the Master. 



ESTHER COBB 

Elm City. N. C. 

From Meredith College we numbered 
Esther Cobb of Elm City as one of our Soph- 
omore class. Since then Esther has attended 
summer school at U. N. C. We often won- 
der how Esther stands on the good side of 
the dean so well, hut are not able to discover 
her method. We arc hoping that this ability 
will be so effective that she will be enabled 
to persuade the "Wilsonian" that she is 
right, to the extent that they won't quarrel 
too often. 



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JOHN E. CROOM 
New Bern. N. C. 

John Emmett Croom from New Bern 
after a year's leave of absence was gladly 
welcomed into our class in 1925. Regard- 
less of what the argument may be or how 
strong the evidence is against him. John con- 
tinues to argue that he is also correct. Even 
the professors find it difficult to get him to 
see their point of view. If he has the cor- 
rect idea and knowledge we are sure that he 
will never be easily influenced to give false 
doctrines in his preaching and teaching. 



NONA GODWIN 
KENLY. N. C. 

Four years ago Nona Gray Godwin came 
to the campus of Atlantic Christian College 
from Kenly. as green as any of the Freshmen. 
Those who knew Nona only on the campus 
thought that she was just a quiet sweet girl, 
but those of us who know her best find her 
to be the life of most everything. She is one 
who can drive most any gloom away. Nona 
proved a very efficient treasurer of the senior 
class. Should she finally decide to do welfare 
work we are confident that she will bring 
much joy to those who are oppressed. 



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VIOLET GOODWIN 
Washington, N. C. 

After attending Meredith one year Violet 
Goodwin, a resident of Washington, joined 
us in the spring of 1925. Violet is known 
for her many words and shrill voice. Her 
voice has aided her greatly in making a good 
cheer leader on many occasions. Violet is a 
member of the Phi Sigma Tau. She believes 
in the policy "All work and no play makes 
Violet a dull girl." 

"77s the songs you sing and the smiles you 

wear, 
That makes the sunshine everywhere." 



MARY HARPER 
Wilson. N. C. 

The noted pianist of the class is Mary 
Harper of Wilson. With pleasure and a feel- 
ing of pride did we welcome Mary as one of 
us. We feel honored to have in our number 
one who has already graduated. With the 
class of '2 7 Mary received her music degree. 
She has shown a great deal of ability for 
leadership, she has been president of the En- ' 
semble Club, vice-president of the Alethian 
Literary Society, and an excellent leader in 
church work. 






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CECIL JARMAN 
Richland, N. C. 

Cecil A. Jarman. from Richland, after at- 
tending summer school at U. N. C is able 
to finish with us. Cecil has made friends 
wherever he has gone and has taken an active 
part in various organizations. He has shown 
great ability in leadership as president of the 
Alethian Literary Society. Cecil is noted for 
his constant hunger and as the champion 
eater. His ambition, he states, is to seek the 
acquisition of more knowledge in the higher 
institutions of learning. 



Francis Jefferson of Washington made his 
way into our college life as a junior. 
"Pinkie." as he is called, came to us from 
State College. We have found that if there 
is anything we want done well, we have only 
to ask "Pinkie" to help the girls and we may 
rest assured that if the girls are willing 
"Pinkie" will do his part. 

"Give the world the best you have and the 
best will come back to you." 




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JAMES T. LAWSON 
Rural Hall, N. C. 

From Rural Hall the college claims an 
intercollegiate debater, James T. Lawson. In 
1926 he won the Faculty Loving Cup; that 
same year he was a member of the Religious 
Education Committee, representing the stu- 
dant body. "Jim" has played a large part 
in the athletics of the college, and in dra- 
matics he is a favorite character. He is a 
clear thinker and an intelligent speaker. He 
has qualities which we believe will make him 
an efficient business man. Much of the suc- 
cess of this volume of THE PINE KNOT will 
be the result of his untiring effort. 



THOMAS G. LEARY 
HOBUCKEN, N. C. 

We have one in the class who is especially 
lull of fun. Thomas Grant Lcary of Ho- 
bucken. "Tommy" after attending summer 
school at U. N. C. and Duke was able to be- 
come a member of our class. To him three 
loyalties are essential to love and college life. 
As a student, he is loyal to the institution 
and his work: as a lover he is loyal to 
Gladys. The class feels itself greatly honored 
by having such a student as assistant to the 
chemistry professor. 



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ETHEL MORGAN 
STOKESDALE. N. C. 

Among our group we have another student 
assistant. Ethel Morgan from Stokesdalc. 
Ethel is assistant in the biology department. 
"All work and little play" seems to be Ethel's 
motto. By attending summer school she is 
able to graduate in three years with higher 
scholastic honor than any member of the 
class. She has won the scholarship cup for 
the last two years. Through her natural abil- 
ity and conscientious work she has accom- 
plished much during her three years college 
career. We arc confident of Ethel's success 
in her teaching, whether it be one or many. 



J. Park Nunn from Kinston found his 
way back to A. C. C. for his senior year's 
work. Park was married to a former student 
of Atlantic Christian College. Two years 
ago he went to Baltimore to live before re- 
turning to college to continue his education. 
He has distinguished himself by his qualities 
of leadership, literary ability and artistic tem- 
perament. Having played such an active part 
in the extra curricula activities and with such 
a wide range of experience, the students made 
him the first president of the Students Asso- 
ciation. Park has meant much toward the 
publishing of this volume of THE PINE 

Knot. 



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PAUL PARKER 
Covington. Ga. 

From Covington, Georgia, the class claims 
Robert Paul Parker as its mystic. Paul prob- 
ably does more real thinking than any other 
member of the class. Having attended South 
Eastern Christian College and graduated from 
Atlanta Theological Seminary in 1925. he 
made another link in our chain in the fall 
of '25. Service to mankind, cither as a 
minister or as a foreign missionary, is Paul's 
ambition and desire. His ability to accom- 
plish either is without question. 



CECIL REEL 
Arapahoe, N. C. 

Cecil Reel, the boy of the class, is never 
lacking in mischief or finding fun in any- 
thing. He is very fond of arguing but has 
never been convinced that he was wrong. 
Cecil has never been known to miss a meal. 
Like the other representatives from Arapahoe. 
Cecil has been one of those who have kept 
athletics going. On the whole Cecil is a fairly 
good fellow. 






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Margaret silverthorne 

Lake Landing, N. C. 

Among the original Freshman class there 
was one from Lake Landing. Margaret Sil- 
verthorne. Since a Freshman she has been 
assistant to the librarian. She has taken a 
great interest in extra-curricula activities, with 
a special interest in dramatics and religious 
organizations. She has been a member of the 
Y. W. C. A. cabinet, and has been president 
during her senior year. Her special interest 
is probably due to the fact that she is giving 
her life to the Master's service, and is plan- 
ning to do mission work on the foreign field. 



LOTTIE SIMMONS 

KlNSTON, N. C. 

Lottie Simmons, how soon she made a 
place for herself in Atlantic Christian College, 
comes form Dover. Lottie has received her 
education from various fields and has reached 
us as a senior with high standing from E. C. 
T. C Yale, and Bethany. She is calm and 
quiet, yet she possesses a strong determina- 
tion. Lottie plans to continue her work at 
Johns Hopkins and become a dietitian. 






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BESSIE SOUTHARD 
STOKESDALE, N. C. 



CASSIE SOUTHARD 
STOKESDALE. N. C. 



Bessie Southard found her way from 
Stokesdalc in the fall of '24 as green as any 
of the Freshmen of that year. To Bessie's 
advantage or disadvantage, she had a brother 
and sister with her. so they did light house- 
keeping at the parsonage while her brother 
preached at the Second Christian Church. 
After the first year she decided to attempt an 
education at another institution. Greatly 
pleased were we to welcome Bessie as one of 
our number as a Junior. Bessie has proven . 
a faithful member of the class. We wish her 
great success in teaching. 



Cassic Southard, also from Stokesdale. 
joined our ranks as a Freshman and with her 
sister thought that she preferred another 
school. With Bessie she experienced her 
Sophomore year at Elon. The following 
year Cassie experienced being a "school- 
mum.'' After attending summer school Cas- 
sic is with us again as a senior. May her 
life as a nurse be a happy and serviceable one. 



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HENRY STILLEY 

COMFORT. N. C. 

Henry Stilley. better known to the students 
as "Stilley.'' came to the class from Comfort. 
N. C. "Stilley'' is seldom heard unless he 
has an idea which he wishes to put across, 
then he always contends that his method is 
best, but too often he is unable to convince 
others of the value of his judgments. Like 
so many young men who have been cap- 
tivated by love and beauty of a fair maid. 
"Stilley" was unable to be held longer from 
the lure of wedding-bells: so he is experi- 
encing his senior life with the dignity of a 
married man. 



SUE ELMA TAYLOR 
Wilson, N. C. 

Probably the one member of the class who 
is heard the least of is Sue Elma Taylor of 
Wilson. Sue Elma has been making her daily 
visits to the campus for the last four years. 
Unlike the majority of the class she seldom 
talks and when she does it is always in a 
soft, sweet tone. She is faithful, earnest and 
sincere. We are sure that with her sweet 
smile and gentle ways she will acquire the 
love and confidence of all her pupils. 



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HARVEY UNDERWOOD 
BAILEY, N. C. 

The clown of the class would be voted 
Harvey Underwood from Bailey. Besides 
being a comedian Harvey has an art in music, 
both in piano and voice. He was in the 
intercollegiate debates and his oratorical abil- 
ity proves him to be a forceful person on 
the platform. Harvey has taken part in all 
the college activities for five long years: one 
year or this, however, he was a commercial 
student. 

"His smiles shoio his happiness, 
tiis friends, his popularity.'' 
"Mingle a little folly with your wisdom: 
and a little nonsense now and then is pleas- 
ant.'' 



I. II. I. IE MAE WHORTON 
Oriental, N. C. 

Lillie Mae Wharton entered college as a 
Freshman in the fall of '25 from Oriental 
By attending summer school Lillie Mac was 
enabled to graduate with the class of '28. 
She never puts herself foremost in any task, 
but is always willing to assist in any task 
that is assigned to her. Those who know 
her best know that she is not the timid girl 
that most would expect upon first knowing 
her. but rather a girl full of wit and deter- 
mination. The class is confident that she will 
be a success in whatever she undertakes. 



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JUNIOR CLASS 

Robert Grady ' Seven Springs, N. C 

Mflba Gay Fountain. N. C. 

Hazel Sasser Wilson, N. C. 

Randolph Munn Rocky Mount, N. C. 






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Dai.I.IS MALLISON Oriental, N. C. 

Virginia Forbes Wilson, N. C. 

Mabel Amerson .... Wilson, N. C. 

Hilary T. Bowen Pinetown, N. C, 




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Dixie Boswell Wilson, N. C. 

Tom Herring Wilson. N. C. 

Hattie Mae Ricks Pantego, N. C. 

Roma Boykin Wilson, N. C. 




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JUNIOR CLASS 

JosiE Hunt Stantonsburg. N. C. 

Walton Thompson Wilson, N. C. 

Mary Sarah Mattox Meldrin. Ga. 

Monroe Fulghum Wilson. N. C. 






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JUNIOR CLASS 

In the fall of 1925 Atlantic Christian College found a number 
of Freshmen registering to receive their initiation for the purpose of 
finding what this so-called college life meant. And were we fresh? 
Were we green? It would be pathetic, to say the least, if we had 
been worse. 

But after a few weeks of "adjustment," reading books on 
"How to Study," and listening to lectures by President Hilley and 
Dean Grim on the subject of "Dawdling," we soon fell in line 
with the upperclassmen and began to really feel collegiate, so much 
so that it was beginning to show by the first time that we were able 
to return home. Our friends were able to notice the change! 

Then came the mid-term exams and a few of our class who 
had not learned the meaning of study decided that they might be 
more successful in other lines of endeavor; and so it came about that 
we entered upon the last lap of our journey with a few casualties. 
The final exams came, marking the close of our careers as "Freshies." 
and now we were able to assume the title of sophisticated 
Sophomores! 

Nineteen Hundred and Twenty-six found us reassembled at 
the registrar's desk, anxious for the further pursuit of knowledge. 
A few old members had dropped from the ranks but there had been 
some additions: and so the class began the new year with but slight 
change in number. This was to be the year of revenge! The in- 
coming freshmen were soon acquainted with us, and after a few 
weeks of the greatest pleasure of our lives — except the pleasure of 
anticipating this wonderful opportunity — we settled down with 
greater ambitions, higher hopes, and aspirations than ever before. 
Soon the same old story was heard: "Your note book is due today" 
or, to be more exact. "They were due last week." 

Page Forty-six 



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Our Freshmen days were harkened back to with a feeling of 
regret, for our responsibilities were rapidly increasing: but mingled 
with this feeling was that of keenest joy in anticipating the joy of 
being a Junior. During this year it began to dawn upon us, as is 
usually the case with Sophomores, that life has a real meaning and 
that all has not been learned during these first two years in college. 
However, commencement found us rather proud of the success we 
had made. We had at last approached the Junior prestige and were 
sitting in the shadow of our goal. "It couldn't be long now." 

The summer vacation was not wasted for when the old crew 
reenlisted in the fall of 1927, a more serious look had come over 
them. The joy, so manifest at the previous commencement, had 
passed away, and the class seemed to be taking their job seriously. 
The year was bidding fair to be a hard one, and so it has been. There 
has been no time for "hall dates" or "campus courses." except for 
those who were able to get by with a minimum of study. But with 
all this it was to be a fairly interesting year: there was so much to 
look forward to, especially the opportunity of entertaining the 
Seniors. 

During this year we have begun to see life in its fuller signifi- 
cance and are trying to make the most of our opportunities. As the 
year closes and moving-up day comes we are rejoicing and feeling 
exceedingly glad for at last the year of all years has come. There is 
no joy greater than that of success: and now we are to be able to 
wear the caps and gowns of our three years' effort. With the close 
of another year we shall have to bid farewell to Atlantic Christian 
College and enter into another phase of life — once more a "Fresh- 
man" — and thus the world goes on! 






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Pine Unot 
SOPHOMORES 

Silas Bass 

I-UCAMA. N. C. 



Catherine Newton 
sebree. icy. 



Willie Taylor 
Arapahoe, N. C. 



Irene Harrison 
Sims, N. C. 



Alton Strickland 
Elm City, n. C. 



Margaret Gillett 
Wilson. N. C, 









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SOPHOMORES 

Donald Midyett 
Oriental. N. C. 



Sarah Askew 
whitakers, n. c. 



Thurman Boyett 
kenly, n. c. 



Violet Rogers 

ROBERSONVILLE, N. C. 



Needham Bryant 
Wilson. N. C. 



Annie Mallison 
Oriental, n. C. 




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SOPHOMORES 



James Llewellyn 
Wilson. N. C. 



Margaret Leggette 
Washington, N. C. 



James Denny 
Wilson, N. C. 



Vivian Banks 
Arapahoe, N. C. 



Tiiaddeus Cherry 
Rocky Mount, N. C. 



Eloise Grady 

Kenly, N. C. 



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SOPHOMORES 



Rachel Rogerson 

ROBERSONVILLE. N. C. 



Ruth Manning 

WILLIAMSTON. N. C. 



Inez Barffoot 
Black Creek, N. C. 



Elizabeth Forbfs 

Wilson. N. C. 



Lettie Lamm 

Wilson, N. C. 



Pattie Thompson 
Black Creek. N. C. 



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SOPHOMORES 



Clifford Hill 

Trenton. N. C. 



Sarah Snuggs 
Wilson, n. C. 



William Minshew 
Lake Butler. Fla. 



Margaret Sasser 
Wilson, N. C. 



J. T. Forrest 

KlNSTON, N. C. 



Annie Simmons 
Wilson. N. C. 






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SOPHOMORES 



Glee Eatman 

SIMMS. N. C. 



Pauline Cox 
belhaven. n. c 



Elmer Jones 
sharpsburg. n. C. 






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THE CLASS OF '30 

The Sophomore class made its first ap- 
pearance on the campus of Atlantic Christian 
College in the fall of 1926, as the largest 
Freshman class that had thus far graced the 
campus. Instead of decreasing in number as 
so many classes have done, they have con- 
tinually increased, until with the close of this 
year they are going to represent by far the 
largest Junior hopes in the history of the 
college. The college spirit which has shown 
such a considerable increase in the past few 
years is due in no small measure to their un- 
usual enthusiasm. 



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FRESHMAN CLASS 

Edna Earl Barnes Curtis Southard 
Wilson, N. C. Stokesdalc. N. C. 



Herberta Stuckey 
Wilson, N. C. 

Ruby Thompson 
Black Creek, N. C. 

Ruby Ricks 
Pantego. N. C. 



Lottie Carawan 
Bath. N. C 

Silas Bass 

Lucama. N. C. 

Marjorie Ellis 
Wilson. N. C. 




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FRESHMAN CLASS 

Ruric Anderson Earl Long 
Enfield, N. C. Wilson. N. C. 



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Merle Owens 
Dunn, N. C. 

William Harris 
Wilson, N, C. 

Julia Jacquemin 
Orlando, Fla. 



Ruby Hinnant 
Kenly, N. C. 

Myra Selby 

Englchard, N. C. 

Virginia Payne 

Bunker Hill. W. Va. 



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FRESHMAN CLASS 



Oscar Farmer 
Wilson. N. C. 

Grace Holden 
Wilson. N. C. 

Luther Bardin 
Black Creek. N. C. 

Louise Green 
Pantego, N. C. 



Raymond Harrel 
Mamie, N. C. 

Mabel Silverthorne 
Lake Landing, N. C. 

James Forbes 
Fountain, N. C. 



Alice Parks 

La Grange. N. C. 






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FRESHMAN CLASS 



Reno Jenkins 
Ayden. N. C. 

Binford Harris 
Wilson. N. C. 

Magdaline Smith 
Dunn. N. C. 

Frank Denby 

Jacksonville. Texas 



Doris Hooks 
Kenly, N. C. 

Nixon Taylor 
Jacksonville. N. C. 

Elizabeth Latham 
Washington. N. C. 

Staley Scott 
Arapahoe, N. C. 




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FRESHMAN CLASS 

Dora Ellis Elsie Grady 

Macclesfield. N. C. Kenly, N. C. 



Horace Isler 
La Grange. N. C. 



Christine Brady 
Wilson. N. C. 

Harvey Bickers 
White Plains, Ga. 



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FRESHMAN CLASS 

Clement Lucas Virginia Boswell 

Black Creek, N. C. Black Creek. N. C. 



W. 



Essie Humphries 
Kinston, N. C. 



Gypsie Boswell 
Wilson. N. C. 



Doris Barefoot 
Wilson. N. C. 



Eunice Davis 
Eureka. N. C. 



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Pauline Bell 
Dunn. N. C. 



Carlton Midyett 
Oriental, N. C. 













Page Sixty-five 



JUST A FRESHMAN 



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All was going well it seemed to me 
And I was liking college life fine. 

But all of a sudden an incident occurred 
That almost changed my mind. 

Four of my class, the Freshman class, 

Thinking to have some fun, 
Tore up the beds of eight upper-classmen. 

And the misery for me begun. 

A Sophomore led the gang, 

Who with paddles crowded the hall, 
And entered the rooms of these Freshmen, 

Who nervously answered the call. 

"Out of beds! Put on your clothes! 

Come on and let's go! 
You must replace the things you moved 

And to refuse means bitter woe!" 

I, standing around, thought it fun 
To see the boys answer the call, 

But all my fun changed to fear 

When a Senior said, "Let's get them all." 

I didn't wait to hear the response, 
But with sadness and fear got gone, 

I went to my room as did other Freshmen 
And knew that it wouldn't be long. 

I could hear them shouting to those boys. 

Who, under guards-, were fixing the beds, 
And, knowing the penalty for the act 

Were working with hanging heads. 

One by one the rooms were fixed 

And down the hall they came 
To fix the room next door to mine 

And then to have their "game." 

Like a mob the gang was howling, 

And I heard one Junior say, 
"Everyone pass, while they ride a chair 

And get one lick for pay." 

By the- time the boys had got their pay 
I was crouched in bed like a cat. 

The leader looked in through the dark 
And sweetly said, "How's that!" 









Page Sixty-six 



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CLASS PRESIDENTS 



CLASS OF '28 
Harvey Brookbank Stokesdak. N. C. 

Because of his noble characteristics. Harvey was chosen by the class of '28 as a favorite 
student for its president. He has proven a successful leader as the chief executive qf the largest 
class ever going out from the institution. His class loyalty and interest is a great factor in the 
success of the Senior class this year. Harvey is a member of the ministerial department, a good 
student and an athlete. The class will be proud of him in the years to come. 






1 



CLASS OF 29 
Walton Thompson Wilson. N. C. 

The class of '29 made no bad move in selecting Walton as its president. His abilities are 
unquestioned and his wholehearted interest and service has been a credit to this class. Walton is a 
good student and exhibits great interest in every worthy activity. 



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CLASS OF '30 



James Denny 



Wilson. N. C. 



As a Freshman. James left a fond impression that was not to be overlooked by his class. 
His favor won recognition as a Sophomore, and he was elected to the honor of president of his 
class. James is a lovable person with qualities of a real leader. The class of '30 is proud of his 
good service and loyalty to their interest. 



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CLASS OF '31 



Binford Harris 



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N. C. 



At their first meeting, the Freshmen found no difficulty in selecting their favorite as presi- 
dent. Binford is a lovable person, and his interest and ability reflected in his personality won the 
favor of his class. The Freshman class is undoubtedly the best the school has seen, and much 
of its greatness is due to the efficiency of its leader. 






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Marvin Bass 
lucama. n. c. 



Grace Hoi.den 
wilson. n. c. 



Needham Bryant 
wilson. n. c. 



HONOR STUDENTS 






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Marvin Bass 
Receiver of the Wilson County Scholarship awarded by the Trustees. 

Grace Holden 
Receiver of the Rotary Club Scholarship awarded by the Wilson Rotary Club. 

Needham Bryant 
Receiver of the Harmon Foundation Eagle Scout Scholarship. 









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Edward R. Tweddale 
Athletic Coach 



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COACH EDWARD R. TWEDDALE 

Coming here from Eureka College in the 
fall of 1927 with little experience as a coach 
but a veteran on the athletic field, Coach 
Tweddale has made himself popular among 
the students of Atlantic Christian College, 
and is rapidly making himself known 
throughout the state. He is facing the prob- 
lems that all coaches have to meet in the small 
colleges with the skill of an artist in this 
work, and the "Greater A. C. C." is looking 
to him to make it a place among the best 
colleges of the State, athletically. 

The section of this book that follows 
bears testimony to the honest efforts of a 
man that loves his work. May this depart- 
ment ever increase. 



Page Seventy-one 












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In the growth of a college there is no single department that can serve as 
a criterion whereby its progress can be measured, but the one most likely used to 
indicate the general direction in which it is moving is the athletic department. 
While athletics are not intended to be the dominating purpose of a college they 
have come to show in a large degree the position of the college as compared with 
other schools. Heretofore, athletics have been so completely submerged by the 
pursuit of academic interests that even the athlete has not been given proper 
. recognition for his endeavors to place the college on a par with other institutions. 
But that attitude has been changed here, and now one can begin to feel the 
influence and the importance of such a department in the growth of Atlantic 
Christian College. 

There is a law of social evolution that the worth of any function must be 
demonstrated before a specialized institution is brought into existence in the 
social order, and we find this same law none the less true in the college world. 
During the past few years the athlete has demonstrated his worth, and as a re- 
sult organizations are beginning to come into existence that are to assure him 
that his worth is being recognized. More attention is being given the depart- 
ment by the administration because it realizes that nothing helped in the recent 
campaign more than the successful teams that the college has been producing. 
The publicity that the institution has had in the past few years has been the 
results of the athlete. The organization of a monogram club this year has been 
nothing more than an attempt to follow in the steps of greater institutions, 
which is a pretty good indication that the trend is upward. 

The athlete of A. C. C. has made himself known wherever he has been 
allowed to participate. Not once in the history of the department has there 
been an unfavorable criticism coming from the opposition, and not once have 
they failed to be commended for their clean sportsmanship and hard playing. 



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FOOTBALL 



No, the "Little Christians" did not win the Little Six Cham- 
pionship, but the season was one of credit for the local collegians. 
Going against a season of exceptional strength on the part of the 
opposition the team fought an uphill battle with a greater number 
of games lost than won. In the outstanding encounter for the year 
staged on the local field Homecoming Day with the Guilford 
"Quakers," and the games with High Point and Catawba — the way 
the team fought to the end — will be remembered no short time. 

When the season began its grind, under the supervision of the 
new coach, Ed. R. Tweddale, the "Christians" were represented by 
strength from last year in Captain Fulghum, Riggan. Munn. Hard- 
ison, Reel, Cherry, and Brookbank. The new blood giving strength 
was Merritt, Howell, Anderson, Uzzle, Isler. Recruits were added 
along during the early days of the season. Exceptional strength 
was found in the coming of "Big Center," Bob Hawkins later. 






Fulghum. End. Captain 



Coach Tweddale 



LAWSON. Manager 



Page Seventy-four 















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An opportunity was given to get an idea as to how the team 
would stack up against opposition in the post-season game with 
Campbell College. Due to the fact that the season was young and 
that only a small part of Coach Tweddale's system had been un- 
caged, the team did not open to their full capacity. However, 
greater strength was exhibited by the local team and the opponents 
were held back by strong defensive work. The quick offense and 
drive showed that A. C. C. had "punch." 




Anderson. Tackle 



RlGGAN, Halfback MUNN, Quarterback 

Page Seventy-five 









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On October 1 the "Little Christians" sped over to High Point 
for a gruelling battle with the "Purple Panthers," in their first real 
college game. Here they met the keen rivals of a year ago trimmed 
in unique form for the attack. Stellar ball was a feature of the exhi- 
bition throughout, with the "Panthers" getting the winning end of 
the score. The fight staged by the "Christians" was one of worthy 
note, and it is to them a credit of honor to have withstood the strong 
opposition of three complete teams — neither better than the other. 



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REEL. Guard 



JEFFERSON. Fullback 



ISLER. Center 









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When the "Little Christians" met Catawba College on the 
latter's field, it was not so much a "bloody" battle as it was a 
"muddy" battle. ( One of the outstanding memories is of the referee 
delaying the game to help some ladies across a canal overflowing 
from the downpour ) . In a steady rain and a muddy field, Riggan's 
feet never got their freedom, neither would Munn's flinging fingers 
stick very well. The attack on both sides was slow with neither 
team in very great danger. The Catawbians got the big end of a 
break for a touchdown. 




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After the team had met the old rivals from Wilmington and 
spelled touchdown and victory on the sport sheet, they traversed a 
part of the Shenandoah Valley on to Roanoke College, Salem, Va. 
Here the "Christians" were forced into a fast encounter with a num- 
ber of first string men on the injured list. In the midst of defeat at 
the hands of the Roanoke College team, we do not lose sight of 
the fight put up by our team. Munn and Hawkins were stars of 
the game that got the eyes of the strangers. Hardison, who was 
shifted from his position to tackle, played his usual game — well. 




BROOKBANK. Tackle HARDISON. Guard 

Page Seventy-eight 



HILL. Tackle 



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The Homecoming encounter was staged against the "Quakers" 
from Guilford College. The game was one of hard fighting on the 
part of both teams, neither of which was able to get much the better 
of the other during the engagement. The strong defense of the 
locals did not break, and another victory was added in the last 
period when the "swift-footed" Riggan dashed around the corner, 
snagged a pass thrown by the opponents, and raced for a touch- 
down. The outstanding star was the whole machine running in 
perfect order. 












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MEEKINS, Fullback UZZLE. Guard MERRITTE, End 



Page Seventy-nine 






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Another encounter to be staged before the local fans was not 
called due to the disbanding of the team by the Army men at Fort 
Bragg. An extra week of rest came for the final game at Charleston. 
S. C, with the Parris Island Marines. Here the "Christians" met 
a strong faction of ex-varsity players who halted for the last time 
their scoring machine. The army men, though victorious, were 
nevertheless in the midst of a real fight throughout the game. The 
A. C. C. boys held the fight and punch to the end. 



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Howell. Halfback 



Gillette. Halfback 



JONES, Halfback 



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SCORES OF THE SEASON 



At N. C. State 40 

At A. C. College 24 

At A. C. College 18 

At A. C. College 28 

At Richmond, C. A. T 25 

At Rocky Mount "Y" 30 

At Goldsboro Mem. Five 40 

At A. C. College 40 

At A. C. College. . ,- 39 

At A. C. College 42 

At Guilford . 30 

At Catawba 50 

At Lenoir Rhyne 39 

At High Point 41 



A. C. College 22 

High Point 37 

Lenoir Rhyne 40 

Guilford 34 

A. C. College 35 

A. C. College 20 

A. C. College 48 

Rocky Mount "Y" 17 

Goldsboro Mem. Five 21 

Catawba 28 

A. C. College 29 

A. C. College 31 

A. C. College 18 

A. C. College 30 






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Opponents 472 



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PLAYERS 

RANNY MUNN (Captain) Foncard 

C. D. RlGGAN Forward 

Monroe Fulghum Center 

Marshall Brinkley Guard 

JlM UZZLE Guard 

SUBS 

Cecil Reel Guard 

Clifford Hill Foncard 

Bob Hawkins Guard 



Page Eighty-three 






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One of A. C. College's greatest advances for the past few years has been on 
the basketball court. Last year the team came home from a trip in the western 
section of the state with the honor of State Champions of the Little Five group 
of colleges. The team did not win the championship this year, but nevertheless 
it played basketball. The great loss to the team from last year was Roy Dunn, 
star guard. New recruits were added, however, and the season was one of credit. 
Some of the games this year were played on courts outside the state with a nunv 
ber of leading small schools of Virginia. The leading colleges of the state were 
met in return games, which netted a number of trips in the state for the local 
team. There were also several encounters with independent teams in this 
section. 

We want to congratulate the team on the fine spirit and sportsmanship 
exhibited throughout the season. To Monroe Fulghum and Captain Ranny 
Munn we extend credit for the superior floor work and all-round good play- 
ing. Brinklcy we also commend for the fight put into every game. Also to 
Riggan and Uzzle we give credit for the proving of their worth on the court. 
The subs we do not forget for Cecil Reel, Bob Hawkins, and C. Hill were 
strength for any defect. To Manager Crqom our hearty appreciation is extended 
for the fine spirit and constant efforts put forth in the task of managership. 



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CIJC 1928 




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SCHEDULE 

March 30 — At A. C. College vs. Lenoir Rhyne College. 

April 6 — At A. C. College vs. Wingate College. 

April 9 — At A. C. College vs. Virginia Medical College. 

April 13 — At Randolph-Macon vs. A. C. College. 

April 16 — At Virginia Medical College vs. A. C. College. 

April 27 — At A. C. College vs. Catawba College. 

May 9 — At High Point College vs. A. C. College. 

May 19 — At Guilford College vs. A. C. College. 

May 11 — At Catawba College vs. A. C. College. 

May 12 — At Lenoir Rhyne College vs. A. C. College. 

May 14 — At Wingate College vs. A. C. College. 

May 19— At Campbell College vs. A. C. College. 






Page Eighty-five 



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THE BASEBALL TEAM 



Harvey Underwood. Manager 

PLAYERS 

ROMA Boykin (Captain ) Pitcher 

Cecil Reel Pitcher 

Bill Gillette ..■ Pitcher 

Marshall Brinkley ' Catcher 

Joseph Mattox Third Base 

C. D. RlGGAN Shortstop 

MONROE FULGHUM Second Base 

JlM UZZLE First Base 

FRANK DENBY _ First Base 

Fred Hardison ....'. Outfield 

Cl.IFEORD Hill Outfield 

"Jake" Howell Outfield 

William Meekins Outfield 

Sonny Midyette Outfield 

Willard Williams Outfield 

Meda Weaver Outfield 

Warren Whitehearst . Pitcher 

Thurman Boyette Outfield 

Ruric Anderson Outfield 

Connie Bass : Catcher 



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We cannot help but view with bright hope the prospective victory that 
lies within reach of the team on the diamond this spring. There's no use saying 
that we haven't got it. for it is a known fact we have, and before the baseball 
season is over some of these little colleges of the state are going to take notice. 
Roma Boykin, the "Little Christian" mound ace, is going good, and look out. 
He has the help of Cecil Reel and Bill Gillette, too. and they are no easy "birds." 
We have already seen the team on the field and the way they hit that ball. The 
team is a dependable one when it comes to hitting, and the fielding is almost 
perfect. Marshall Brinkley is behind the bat, and that is enough, for he sure 
knows the game and can play it. There is Joe Mattox at third, C. D. Riggan 
at short, and Monroe Fulghum at second — just a combination hard to beat. 
The outfield is just as strong with a number of candidates. It looks like a 
championship year. 

The local team is slated for a well-rounded schedule, including the leading 
small colleges of the state, and others outside the state. Besides the regular 
schedule a number of eastern Carolina and Piedmont League teams are slated 
for the "Little Christians." 






Page Eighty-seven 

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2Tf)C 1928 




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STUDENT LIFE 

The spirit of the college is revealed by the 
interest and enthusiasm manifested through the 
activities of the students themselves. In such ac- 
tivities is the bed-rock of a real college spirit. At 
Atlantic Christian College we find a well-rounded 
student life that extends into every phase of the 
college community with whole-heartedness and 
diligence. Into the past we look with pride on 
great things accomplished; into the future our 
thoughts extend with great hope for a greater 
Atlantic Christian College, made bigger and bet- 
ter by the consecrated efforts of the students in 
their activities and functions. 






Page Ninety 









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OFFICERS 

J. P. NUNN .... President 

H. T. BOWEN Vice-President 

Inez Barefoot Secretary 

VIRGINIA PAYNE .... Assistant Secretary 

THE COUNCIL 

Cecil Jarman Senior 

(Margaret Silverthorne) 

RANNY MUNN Junior 

(Eva Scott ) 

James Denny Sophomore 

Charles Bissette Freshman 

Ruth Manning Y. \V. C. A. 

Jesse Forrest Y. M. C. A. 



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C.TTl.BQriKs 

Bus.lflawer 




JohnEX/room 

ttasl Lai tor 



Robert Grady 
Q55t. Bus.HQaTiager 



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The 1928 Pine Knot 
























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ASSOCIATE 
EDITORS 

THE 

PINE KNOT 

1928 





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HESPERIAN LITERARY SOCIETY 



ROLL 1927-'2i 



Clem M. Banks 
Cecil Reel 
J. Robert Gradv 
Eva Scott 
Sarah Askew 
Staily Scott 
Grace Holden 
Mary Mattox 
Dallis Mallison 
Margaret Leggette 
Elizabeth Latham 
Pinkie Jefferson 
Harvey Underwood 
Violet Goodwin 
H. T. Bowen 
Esther Cobb 
James Lawson 
Neva Banks 
Willie Taylor 



Ruth Manning 
Renno Jenkins 
Merle Owens 
Pauline Bell 
Thad Cherry 
Nina Belangia 
Donald Midyett 
Cora Lee Osborne 
Margaret Osborne 
Herberta Stuckey 
Clifford Hill 
Mabel Amerson 
Blanch Bickers 
Lillie Wharton 
Jesse Forrest 
Fred Hardison 
Ranny Munn 
John Croom 
Vivian Banks 



Page Ninety-five 



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Janet 
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Sec. 



YYlary 
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Fits} 5e.mesier V'Pres. 




lUtkWlae Cecil tt.Jarmaii William 

RicKs Pres. Wteqrnann 

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OFFICERS 




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oyerson Simmons 

Second Semesler U -Pres. 




TIM la uf a i} on Thompson n ^ a T ^V . 

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ALETHIAN LITERARY SOCIETY 



Eunice Aycock 
Inez Barefoot 
Doris Barefoot 
Silas Bass 
Marvin Bass 
Julia Belches 
Roma Boykin 
Clyde Braden 
Christine Brady 
Harvey Brookbank 
Lottie carawan 
Pauline Cox 
janet daughtery 
James Denny 
Dora Ellis 
Monroe Fulghum 
Melba Gay 
Louise Green 
Mary Harper 
Irene Harrison 



ROLL 1927-2? 

Raymond Harrel 
Josie Hunt 
Essie Humphries 
Horace Isler 
Julia jacquemin 
Ethel Johnson 
Paul Parker 
Earl Long 
Myra Selby 
Ruby Ricks 
Ruth Sasser 
Jim Uzzle 
Cecil Jarman 
Ethel Morgan 
Tommie Leary 
Walton Thompson 
Elizabeth Kirby 
Annie Mallison 
Francis manning 
William Minshew 



Catherine Newton 
Virginia Payne 
Hattie Mae Ricks 
Violet Rogers 
Racher Rogerson 
Hazel Sasser 
Margaret Silverthorne 
Mabel Silverthorne 
Lottie Simmons 
Annie Simmons 
Magdalene Smith 
Bessie Southard 
Curtis Southard 
Cassie Southard 
Hazel Spencer 
Henry Stilley 
Nixon Taylor 
Ruby Thompson 
Pattie Thompson 
William Wiegman 






Page Ninety-seven 






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COLLEGE DEBATERS 

INTERCOLLEGIATE 

James Lawson f Rural Hall, N. C. 

Harvfy Underwood Bailey. N. C. 

Walton Thompson Wilson, N. C. 

INTERSOCIETY 

Alethian 

Ruby Ricks Pantego. N. C. 

William Wiegman Orlando. Fla. 

Hesperian 

James Lawson Rural Hall, N. C. 

Robert Grady Seven Springs. N. C. 

Page Ninety-eight 






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DEBATING 

INTERCOLLEGIATE 

QUERY: "Resolved, That the United States should cease to protect by 
armed force capital invested in foreign lands except after formal declaration of 
war." 

Atlantic Christian College vs. University of Florida 
February 28, 1928 



Affirmative 
Walton Thompson 
Harvey Underwood 
James Lawson 



Negative 
Samuel Milam 
Edward Miller 
Campbell Thornal 



Atlantic Christian College us. Guilford College 

March 9. 1928 
Affirmative Negative 

Harvey Underwood 
James Lawson 



INTERSOCIETY 

QUERY: "Resolved. That the United States Congress should enact a uni- 
form marriage and divorce law." 









Hesperian vs. Alethian 
March 17, 1928 



Affirmative 
Robert Grady 
James Lawson 



Negative 
Ruby Ricks 
William Wiegman 



Page Ninety-nine 



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WILSON COUNTY CLUB 

MOTTO: "We are now becoming what we hope to be." 
FLOWER: Pink Rose COLORS: Pink and Green 

OFFICERS 

Walton Thompson President 

NHEDHAM BRYAN Vice-President 

Esther Cobb Secretaru 















Page One Hundred 















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"FURRINER'S" CLUB 

MOTTO: "See A. C. C. first." 
FLOWER: The Collard 



COLOR: Green 



OFFICERS 

MARY MATTOX President 

Julia Belches Vice-President 

Harvey Bickers Secretary 

WILLIAM MlNSHEW Treasurer 



r777777K-.\\\\\M 






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Prof. F. F. Grim. Adviser 



MEMBERS 



Clem Banks 
Harvey Underwood 
James Lawson 
Ethel Morgan 
R. N. Hinnant 
Roscoe Powers 
Jesse Forrest 
Henry Stilley 



Robert Grady 
William Wiegman 
Park Nunn 
Hazel Sasser 
Cassie Southard 
Ruth Manning 
Walton Thompson 
Mrs. L. J. Bickers 



Cecil Jarman 



Page One Hundred Two 
















Page One Hundred Three 






Cfte 1928 




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THE EDUCATION CLUB 

The Education Club is composed of members of the faculty 
who have special interest in the department of education, and of 
students who have had one or more courses in the department of 
education. 

The aims and purposes of the club are: To develop and make 
effective the personality of its members; to promote a close fellow- 
ship among members of the department of education; to cultivate 
a higher appreciation of teaching as a profession by encouraging 
more thorough preparation and the acceptance of higher ethical 
standards, and to discuss educational problems of interest to all 
good citizens, especially those who are planning to teach. 

The Education Club meets semi-monthly for a program con- 
sisting of lectures by men and women who are working in the field 
of education, of talks on different phases of education by the mem- 
bers, and group discussions. Of the most noted speakers this year 
are: Mrs. C. Manly Morton, Rev. John Barclay, Professor Grim, 
Professor Hamlin, and the Principal of the Wilson Colored High 
School. 

The outstanding social event of the club is the annual outdoor 
breakfast, which is given in the spring. 



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THE EDUCATION CLUB 



ROLL. 1 

Prof. F. F. Grim 
Prof. C. H. Hamlin 
Prof. F. A. Harper 
Nona Godwin 
Pauline Cox 
Annie Simmons 
Margaret Silverthorne 
Ethel Johnson 
Hazel Sasser 
Hattie Mae Ricks 
Margaret Osborne 
Lillie Mae Wharton 
Dallas Mallison 

Cora Lee 



927-'28 

Margaret Sasser 
Irene Harrison 
Lottie Simmons 
Melba Gay 
Pattie Thompson 
Esther Cobb 
Henry Stilley 
Neva Banks 
Elizabeth Kirby 
Annie Mallison 
Mrs. L. J. Bickers 
Cassie Southard 
Eva Scott 
Osborne 



Page One Hundred Five 



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DORMITORY ASSOCIATION FOR BOYS 



OFFICERS 

Harvey Brookbank President 

MONROE FULGHUM Vice-President 

CLYDE BRADEN Secretary 

COUNCIL 

Cecil Jarman Senior 

JOHN CROOM Senior 

Paul Parker Senior 

Roma Boykin ■ Junior 

RANNY MUNN ■ Junior 

William Wiegman Sophomore 

Perry Hales Sophomore 

Page One Hundred Six 

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PHI SIGMA TAU 

Founded, 1912 
Motto : "Cor Unum, Via Una.' 



COLORS: Black and Gold 



FLOWER: Black-eyed Susan 



CHAPTER ROLL 
1927-'28 



Class of 



Violet Goodwin 



Esther Cobb 



Mary Mattox 



Sarah Askew 



Class of '29 

Hattie Mae Ricks 
Mabel Amerson 

Class of '30 

Catherine Ware 
Margaret Leggette 



Class of '31 
Magdalene Smith Herberta Stuckey 

Mrs. H. M. STOLL Sorority Sponsor 






Page One Hundred Eight 



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COLORS: Gold and White 



SIGMA TAU CHI 

Founded. 1920 

FLOWER: Yelloiv Chrysanthemum 



CHAPTER ROLL 

1927-'28 









-,'■ 



C/ass of '11 



Eunice Aycock 



Mary Harper 



Ruth Manning 
Rachel Rogerson 
Eloise Grady 



Class of 'IV 
Melba Gay 

Class of '30 

Nina Belangia 
Violet Rogers 
Inez Barefoot 
Janet Daugherty 



Class of '31 
Renno Jenkins , Merle Owens 
Elsie Grady Julia Jacquemin 
Mrs. A. R. MOORE Sorority Mother 






Page One Hundred Ten 






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SIGMA ALPHA FRATERNITY 






COLORS: Silver and Lavender 



FLOWER: Siveet Pea 



MOTTO : "Semper est Amicitia. 



CHAPTER ROLL 

1927-'28 









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Class of '28 
Gordon E. Boswell 

Class of '29 
Monroe Fulghum Roma Boykin 

Thomas Herring C. D. Riggan, Jr. 

Class of '30 
Thaddeus Cherry James Denny 

James Llewellyn 

Class of ' 3 1 
Oscar Farmer Frank Denby 

Raymond Harold Jim Uzzle 

Charles Bissette 



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Prof. Errol L. Fox 



PHI KAPPA ALPHA 

Founded 1925 



COLORS: Gold and White 



Clem Banks 
Thomas Leary 
Cecil Jarman 
James Lawson 



Robert Grady 



Clifford Hill 
Clyde Braden 



Ruric Anderson 



Flower: Daisy 
CHAPTER ROLL 
1928 

Class of '28 

Francis Jefferson 
Cecil Reel 
Harvey Underwood 
Harvey Brookbank 



Class of '29 



Class of '30 



Class of ' 3 I 



Ranny Munn 



Fred Hardison 
Bill Wiegman 



Horace Isler 



Page One Hundred Fourteen 






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HIGH POINT'S IN THE SOCIAL CALENDAR 






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FRAT£RA//77£S 

Phi Kappa Alpha 

Annual Spring Banquet given at the Rocky Mount Country 
Club, May 29, 1928. 

Sigma Alpha 

Annual Spring Banquet given by the Chapter at the close of 
each school year. 

SORORITIES 

Sigma Tau Chi 
Annual Spring Banquet given at the Cherry Hotel, May 19, 

Phi Sigma Tau 

Annual Spring Banquet given at the Country Club in the last 
week of the school year. 



1928. 



Page One Hundred Sixteen 









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GLEE CLUB 

ATLANTIC CHRISTIAN COLLEGE 
PRESENTS 



'TRIAL BY JURY" 
A Dramatic Cantata 

The cantata is a satire on English jurisdiction written by W. S. Gilbert, 



who was himself a graduate of one of England's law schools and for a number 
of years one of its. leading lawyers. Arthur Sullivan matches this satire with 
beautiful and striking melodies that fit the setting perfectly. Thus, the collabo- 
ration has been a happy one. One of the leading musical critics says that "while 
Mr. Sullivan's music is as comic and lively as anything by Offenbach, it has the 
extra advantage of being the work of a cultivated musician who would scorn 
to write ungrammatically, even if he could." 

The story goes that there is a beautiful young lady suing a "young scamp 
of a rover" for breach of promise. He admits the charges brought against him 
but says that he has changed "just as all things in nature changeth." He 
promises to marry the plaintiff to appease her sorrows but assures them that 
he may marry this new love next day. The judge, who was married to a "rich 
attorney's elderly, ugly daughter," falls for the plaintiff, and upon seeing that 
no satisfactory arrangements can be made declares that the barristers can "put 
your briefs upon the shelf, for I will marry her myself." 



The closing remarks of the judge reflects the comedy of the cantata: 



"7 hough homeward as uou trudge 



You declare my law is fudge 
Yet of beuuty I am a \udge — " 

Miss Cecil Hodam, Director 
Miss Mary Harper, Accompanist 



CAST OF CHARACTERS 

JUDGE ( baritone ) Mr. Shockley 

PLAINTIFF (soprano) Miss Nina Belangia 

Council for Plaintiff (tenor) William Weigman 

DEFENDANT (tenor) Paul Parker 

Foreman of the Jury (bass.) James Lawson 

USHER (baritone) Harvey Underwood 

Jurymen 
Chorus 

Page One Hundred Eighteen 










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GLEE CLUB 



Miss Cecil Hodam, Director 
Miss Mary Harper, Accompanist 

OFFICERS 

Hattie Mae Ricks President 

Virginia Payne Secretary 

WILLIAM WlEGMAN Business Manager 

MEMBERS 

Nina Belangia B. G. Carson Eva Scott 

Sarah Askew Gladys Spencer Myra Selby 

Ruby Thompson Harvey Underwood Paul Parker 

Curtis Southard Annie Mallison Nixon Taylor 

Janet Daugherty Mabel Silverthorne James Lawson 

Hilary Bowen Doris Barefoot Cecil Jarman 

Ruby Ricks J. W. Shockley 






Page One Hundred Nineteen 



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Clje 1928 




THE DEPARTMENT OF MUSIC 



ATLANTIC CHRISTIAN COLLEGE 
PRESENTS 

Miss Cecil Hodam 

IN FACULTY RECITAL 

January 31, 1928—8:30 O'clock 

Assisted by 

-Miss Charlotte Armstrong 

Miss Mildred Wiggins, Accompanist 



I 



PROGRAM 

CARO Mio Ben (old Italian) Giordani 

Polly Willis (old' English) Arm 

My LOVELY CELIA (old English) Monroe 

Aria, Oil. HAD I JUBAL'S LYRE (from Joshua) Handel 

HARK, HARK, THE LARK (from Shakespeare) Schubert 

Wandering Schubert 

SYLVELIN Sinding 

Aria, Je Suis TlTANIA ( from Mignon ) Thomas 












PART TWO 

ROMANCE Rubenstein-W 'ieniawski 

VIENNESE Gaertner-Kreisler 

FRASQUITA '....'. Lahar-Kreisler 

BONJOUR, SOUSON Pesard 

II ETAIT UN BERGERE French Folk Song 

L'ETE Chaminade 

An ElNEN BOTEN La Forge 

Animal Crackers Hodgeman 

Rain. Rain, Rain , Gay 

To A Wild Rose MacDowell 

The Winds in the South Scott 

Page One Hundred Twenty 









Ci)e 1928 



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MUSIC STUDENTS 

Miss Cecil Hodam Director 



ROLL 



Rachel Rogerson 
Elizabeth Campbell 
Ethel Bruffey 
Annie Mallison 
Hattie Mae Ricks 
Nina Belangia 
Mary Harper 



Magdaline Smith 
Mrs. J. W. Shockley 
Nixon Taylor 
Curtis Southard 
William Wiegman 
J. T. Creech 
Paul Parker 



Gladys Spencer 



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Page One Hundred Twenly-one 















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February 21, 1928 



Romance From "Mignon" Thomas 

Violets Wright 

Nina Belangia 

Banjo Song Homer 

Nixon Taylor 



Page One Hundred Twenty-two 



•.-<- 



Cfje 1028 ^SPr l^inc Unot 
ATLANTIC CHRISTIAN COLLEGE 

DEPARTMENT OF MUSIC 
IN VOCAL RECITAL 
College Auditorium 



•;♦ *;* •;* 

■ 

Three for Jack Squire 

William Wiegman 

Damon Stange 

Shadows March Del Riego 

Mary Harper 

The Beautiful Garden of Prayer Fillmore 

Paul Parker 



Charming Marguerite Old French 

Mammy's Song Ware 

Magdaline Smith 

Cloud Shadows . , Rogers 

Indian Dawn Zamecnik 

Mrs. J. W. Shockley 

All Through the Night Welch Melody 

The Mighty Deep Juede 

Curtis Southard 






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DRAMATICS 

Dramatics play an important part in the life 
and activities of Atlantic Christian College. Each 
year the Dramatic Club begins working early 
with the new officers in charge. The club seeks 
to include in its membership all who are interested 
in the dramatic art, and especially the students of 
expression. In an organized manner this depart- 
ment's aim is the social and cultural development 
of its members, through the functioning of the 
club. During the year a number of plays are 
staged by the club which are exceedingly credit- 
able to the interest of the school. This year the 
outstanding presentations were, "The Whole 
Town's Talking." a farce in three acts, and three 
one-act plays presented in contest for the state- 
wide meet at Chapel Hill. Recitals in expression 
feature the program from this department each 
year. Among the social events for the year are 
teas, parties, picnics, etc. 

The department is under the efficient direction 
of Mrs. Mamie Jennings Lucas, of Wilson. 



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DRAMATIC CLUB 



Herberta Stuckey 
Lottie Carawan 
Ruby Ricks 
Elizbeth Latham 
Merle Owens 
Catherine Ware 
Magdeline Smith 
Mary Mattox 
Ruby Thompson 
Myra Selby 
Josie Hunt 
Janet Daughtery 
Earl Long 
Inez Barefoot 
J. T. Forrest 
Roscoe Powers 
Marvin Bass 



MEMBERS 



Margaret Silverthorne 
Curtis Southard 
Doris Barefoot 
Harvey Brookbank 
Cecil Jarman 
Nona Godwin 
Eunice Aycock 
Esther Cobb 
Melba Gay 
James Lawson 
Hattie Mae Ricks 
Grace Holden 
Charles Bissette 
Bill Harris 
Binford Harris 
Neva Banks 
Edna Alford 



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DRAMATIC CLUB 

Mamie Jennings Lucas Directot 

OFFICERS 

HARVEY BROOKBANK . . President and Business Manager 

HERBFRTA STUCKEY Vice-President 

RUBY RlCKS Secretary 

NONA GODWIN Treasurer 









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Page One Hundred Twenty-five 






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SENIOR RECITAL 

By 
Mrs. Blanch Clark Bickers 

Pupil of 

Mrs. Mamie Jennings Lucas 

Expression Department 

ATLANTIC CHRISTIAN COLLEGE 

8:00 P. M.. April 20. 1028 



Gretna Green Constance D'Arcy McKaye 

(A dramatic miniature of Richard Brinsley Sheridan and his lover) 

As You Like It, Act IV, Scene I Shakespeare 

Merchant of Venice, Act I, Scene II Shakespeare 

INTERMISSION 

Come Into the Garden (A Lyric From "Maud") Tennyson 

The Famine From Hiawatha Longfelloiv 

The Marriage Will Not Take Place Alfred Sutro 

(A Play in One Act) 






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EXPRESSION STUDENTS 



Mamie Jennings Lucas Instructor 



ROLL 



Mrs. Blanch Bickers 
Mary Mattox 
Merle Owens 
Melba Gay 
Eunice Aycock 
Nona Godwin 



Inez Barefoot 
Margaret Silverthorne 
Ruby Ricks 
Neva Banks 
Hyacinth Garner 
Bill Harris 






Binford Harris 

Page One Hundred Twenty -seven 


















Cftc 1928 v SfiS^ Pine ttnot 















ONE-ACT PLAYS 

Presented by the 

ATLANTIC CHRISTIAN COLLEGE 

College Dramatic Club 

Tuesday. April 3. 1928 



I 

"OVERTONES"— by 

CAST 

Harriet MARY MATTOX 

Margaret GRACE HOI.DEN 

Hetlv Edna Alford 

Maggie MRS. L. J. BICKERS 



























II 

"MY LADY'S LACE"— by 

CAST 
Nurse Neva Banks 

Father BlNFORD HARRIS 

Lover WILLIAM HARRIS 

Girl Ruby Ricks 

in 

"THANK YOU. DOCTOR' —by 
CAST 

Doctor Marvin Bass 

Cort J. T. Forrest 

Mrs. Lester ' HERBERTA STUCKEY 

Patient ROSCOE POWERS 

Nurse Esther Cobb 

Page One Hundred Twenty -eight 



























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THE ATLANTIC CHRISTIAN COLLEGE 
DRAMATIC CLUB 

Presents 

"The Whole Town's Talking" 

A FARCE IN THREE ACTS 

By 

John Emerson and Anita Loos 

Directed by 

Mrs. Mamie Jennings Lucas 

HIGH SCHOOL AUDITORIUM 

Friday. March 16 at 8:00 P. M. 



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CAST OF CHARACTERS 

Henry Simmons, a Manufacturer BlNFORD HARRIS. Jr. 

Harriett Simmons, his wife INEZ BAREFOOT 

Ethel Simmons, their daughter MERLE OWENS 

Cherster Benney. Simmons' partner J. T. FORREST 

Letty Lythe, a motion picture star GRACE HOLDEN 

Donald Swift, a motion picture director W. H. BROOKBANK 

Roger Shields, a young Chicago blood WILLIAM HARRIS 

Lily Wilson ) . f Hattie Mae RlCKS 

r .. „ . } Friends of Ethel { . - . „ -,„, 

Sally Otis ) { MELBA GAY 

Annie, a maid EUNICE AYCOCK 

Sadie Bloom HERBERTA STUCKEY 

Taxi-driver THAD CHERRY 

Page One Hundred Twenty-nine 

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COMMENCEMENT PLAY 

THE ATLANTIC CHRISTIAN COLLEGE 

DRAMATIC CLUB 

Presents 

A. A. MILNE'S COMEDY 

"The Romantic Age" 

Staged by Frederick Stanhope 
In 
- THE COLLEGE AUDITORIUM 

May, 1928 

THE CAST 

Mrs. Knowle INEZ BAREFOOT 

Melisande (Her Daughter) MARY MATTOX 

Jane Bagot (Her Niece) CATHERINE WARE 

Alice Neva Banks 

Mr. Knowle ROSCOE POWERS 

Bobby '..... William Harris 

Gervase Mallory BlNFORD Harris, Jr. 

Ern J. T. FORREST 

Master Susan HARVEY BROOKBANK 

SYNOPSIS OF SCENES 

Act I — The Hall of Mr. Knowle's House; Evening. 
Act II — A Glade in the Woods; Morning. 
Act III — The Hall Again: Afternoon. 






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Page One Hundred Thirty 













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THE DEPARTMENT OF RELIGION 

The Department of Religion, the central motivating force of 
the college, has as its ultimate purpose the aim of the college, which 
is, to develop character through Christian education, to combine 
with the development of the intellectual faculties a growing spiritual 
insight, to inspire to active service in every righteous cause, and thus 
to have a part in contributing to the world efficient Christian leader- 
ship. It is the .purpose of this department to so vitalize the prin- 
ciples of Christianity which will develop a safeguard against im- 
morality. Its interest is in character as well as intellect. 

The immediate purpose of the religious department is two- 
fold: "To train young men and women for the ministry of God's 
word and to train young people who will enter other fields of service 
to be useful and efficient leaders in Christ's kingdom. There is a 
great need for church leadership adequately and efficiently trained, 
but that is not all for them, for there are the many who take an 
active part in religious education, as such. They may receive from 
this department that "Light of Life" which will set the flames aglow 
to go out and reinvigorate and revitalize the church, making it a 
dynamic factor wherever their influences may reach. 

If those who leave Atlantic Christian College are to make use- 
ful and efficient citizens of the nation and of the Kingdom of God 
they must have an intellectual knowledge of the word of God and 
their hearts and minds must be filled with the ideals of Christ, backed 
by a moral character with fine ethical qualities which must undergird 
all lines of substantiality. 

In this department there are being offered this year three courses 
in Bible literature, one in Christian evidence, one in Practical Minis- 
try, and one in the Introduction to Religious Education — Professor 





















Page One Hundred Thirty-two 









Shockley, who is at the head of the religious department, states that 
he feels it his special duty to train young men and women for church 
leadership. Inasmuch as it is possible, he is succeeding, but more 
than this, his very life is having a tremendous influence in advancing 
the spiritual and moral life of the entire student body. Never is he 
too busily employed to give advice to those students who are seek- 
ing help on problems. By his unswerving loyalty to the Bible and 
the principles of Christ he has won the love and admiration of the 
student body. 

Under Professor Shockley's leadership the ministerial students 
have taken it in their hands to carry out one phase of the Pentecostal 
aims of the college, namely: "Service to the churches." They have 
worked out a program whereby the students can serve the churches 
and at the time time develop an interest in the college. A large num- 
ber are having the college presented to them in its true light by the 
students themselves. 









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J. Watson Shockley 
Head Department of Religion 

Professor Shockley came to Atlantic Christian College in the fall of 1927 for the first 
time. He has proven by his work this year that he is a very efficient and capable man to take 
the seat as head of the Religious Department. His pleasing manner and delightful personality 
has won the love of all who know him. We feel that his influence and work is going to 
account for much in the religious life of the school and the life of the church. His chief interest 
is with those who are to stand for Christ in the pulpit and a closer fellowship of the church 
and its college. Through his efforts great strength will be added to the Master's service. 



Page One Hundred Thirty-four 



















■ 



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. '• 






Y. M. C. A. 

OFFICERS 

R.ANNY MUNN. President Rocky Mount, N. C. 

WILLIAM MlNSHEW, Vice-President Lake Butler, Fla. 

JOE BICKERS, Secretary White Plains, Ga. 

Mr. J. M. WATERS, Treasurer Wilson, N. C. 






Page One Hundred Thirty-fivi 



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THE Y. W. C. A. 

The Young Women's Christian Association ranks as one of the oldest 
religious organizations on the campus. It has been a great force in the develop- 
ment of Christian character, and an asset to the religious life of the student body. 

The Y. W. C. A. meets regularly each Sunday evening at 6:30 for 
discussion of the many problems that confront the student of today. The 
programs are both enlightening and entertaining. It is through this medium 
that student life is brought into a closer communion and fellowship. 



EZsBEaSa 



fPage One Hundred Thirty-six 


















f 






























8&&&g "ixt 

Cfte 1928 
















Margaret Silverthorne President 

Hattif Mae RICKS Vice-President 

Elizabeth Kirby Secretary 

Ethel Morgan Treasurer 

RACHEL ROGERSON Social Service Committee 

Violet Goodwin Social Committee 

MELBA Gay Finance Committee 

JANET DAUGHTERY Program Committee 

NINA BELANGIA Music Committee 



Page One Hundred Thirty-seven 












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THE FELLOWSHIP 

The name itself carries with it the real meaning and spirit of this organi- 
zation. It is not a club as other organizations on the campus, but a real fellow- 
ship of those students who are preparing for full time Christian service. It 
seeks to include in its membership any others who are vitally interested in work 
of religious nature. The "Fellowship" is the nucleus of the spiritual life on 
the campus. 



MEMBERSHIP 



Henry W. Stilley 
Prof. C. K. Holsapple 
Staley V. Scott 
Margaret Silverthorne 
Jesse T. Forrest 
Janet Daugherty 
Joe W. Bickers 
John E. Croom 
Harvey Brookbank 
William Minshew 
Dallas Mallison 



Hilary T. Bowen 
Nixon A. Taylor 
Ethel Morgan 
Harvey E. Bickers 
Cecil -A. Jarman 
James T. Lawson 
R. N. Hinnant 
Prof. J. W. Shockley 
Pres. H. S. Hilley 
Mrs. Blanch Bickers 
Paul Parker 



William Wiegman 






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Page One Hundred Thirty-eight 
















THE FELLOWSHIP 

OFFICERS 

First Semester 

William Wiegman President 

CECIL JARMAN Vice-President 

CLYDE BRADIN Secretary 

Second Semester 

H. T. BOWEN President 

JOE BICKERS Vice-President 

Bessie Southard : Secretary 






Page One Hundred Thirty-nine 



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THE RELIGIOUS EDUCATION COMMITTEE 

The Religious Education Committee has for many years been the para- 
mount committee of the college. It is composed of members of the faculty, the 
president of the college, the minister of the Christian Church, Wilson, and stu- 
dent representatives from the religious organizations and the student body. 
The function of the committee is to foster and promote religious interest and 
activity, It seeks to set in motion influences that will contribute to the build- 
ing of Christian character. Each year the committee brings to the college some 
on' 1 to carry on a series of sermons looking towards a deepening of faith and 
enlistment in Christian service. The committee endeavors to work quietly but 
effectively in the complex life of the college. 

MEMBERS OF THE COMMITTEE 

H. S. HlLLEY President of the College 

JOHN BARCLAY Minister Christian Church 

Miss Frances Harper Faculty 

J. W. SHOCKLEY Faculty 

F. F. GRIM Faculty 

Hilary Bowen Fellowship 

Perry Hales Y. M. C. A. 

Margaret Silverthorne Y. \V. C. A. 

Inez Barefoot Student Body 

William Wiegman Student Body 






Page One Hundred Forty 



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COLLEGE QUARTETTE 

Prof. J. Watson Shockley Bass 

Paul Parker First Tenor 

William Wiegman Second Tenor 

Nixon Taylor Baritone 












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Page One Hundred Forty-one 






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PENTECOST PROGRAM FOR ATLANTIC 
CHRISTIAN COLLEGE 

1 . _ Service to Chuches : 

a. Enlistment of twelve new recruits for full time Christian service each year. 

h. Professors and students of Atlantic Christian College serving as ministers 
of seventy-five churches that must have part-time leadership. 

c. Every student leaving college prepared to take his place in the local church 
at home and ready to begin when needed. 

2. Internal Policies: 

a. The whole administrative and educational policy of the college motivated 
from the standpoint of the welfare of the churches and the upbuilding of 
the Lord Jesus Christ in the life and experience of the student body. 

3. Physical Equipment: 

a. The completion by 1930 of a new college plant sufficient to care ade- 
quately for 300 students. 

4. Financial Aim: 

(7. Completion of the full collection of the $320,000 pledged for the endow- 
ment fund. 

b. The churches giving $10,000 each year for annual maintenance. 






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PROMINENT SPEAKERS AT A. C. C. THIS YEAR 

Miss Camme Gray 
Missionary in China 

Miss Cynthia Pearl Maus 
St. Louis. Mo. 

Dr. W. E. Macklin 
Missionary to China (Retired) 



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Mrs. C. Manly Morton 
Missionary. Porto Rica 

Rev. C. H. Plopper 

Missionary from Nanking. China 
(Came under the auspices of the Religious Education Committee) 






Page One Hundred Forty-four 



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POPULAR SELECTIONS 

FOR 

The Prettiest Girl GRACE HOLDEN 

THE MOST POPULAR 

Girl Rachel Rogerson 

Boy Harvey Underwood 

THE BEST BLUFFER 

Girl Cora Lee Osborne 

Boy Clem Banks 

THE MOST ARDENT LOVER 

Girl Ruby Ricks 

Boy James Lawson 

THE MOST ABSENT-MINDED 

Girl .- Margaret Leggett 

Boy Henry Stilley 

THE MOST TALKATIVE 

Girl Margaret Leggett 

Boy "Sonny" Midyette 

THE BEST ATHLETE 

Girl Neva Banks 

Boy CD. Riggan, JR. 















■/ 






WHO'S WHAT 

Most Lovable JANET DAUGHERTY 

Best All-Round HARVEY BROOKBANK 

Best Orator WILLIAM WlEGMAN 

Best Dcbator JAMES LAWSON 

Brainest ETHEL MORGAN 

Heartbreaker CLYDE BRADEN 

Biggest Squawkcr "BOB" HAWKINS 

Freshiest "Rat" FRANK DENBY 

Greenest STALEY SCOTT 

Biggest Bum ALTON STRICKLAND 

Biggest Knocker THAD CHERRY 

Laziest '. JAMES UZZLE 

Most Dignified INEZ BAREFOOT 

Happiest Doris Barefoot 

It (as he thinks) RURIC ANDERSON 

Biggest Bull Slinger ROMA BOYKIN 

Most Mannerly BlNFORD HARRIS 

"Sheikiest" BILL HARRIS 

"Man of Letters" .' DALLIS MALLISON 

Most Bashful LlLLIE WHORTON 

Grouchest ESTHER COBB 



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Page One Hundred Forty-six 






CDc 1928 lISP P»™ ^ not 







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Atlantic Christian College offers to 
young men and women of the Carolinas 
an opportunity to secure a liberal educa- 
tion in a standard college of limited en- 
rollment at a minimum expense and 
under Christian influence. 

Information about its life and work 
will be gladly given. 



Atlantic Christian College 

Wilson. North Carolina 






Atlantic Christian 
College 

WILSON, North Carolina 



Page One Hundred Forty-eight 






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The Norfolk Southern Railroad offers excellent service between 
Eastern North Carolina points, operating Pullman Drawing-Room 
Sleeping cars between Norfolk and Raleigh and between Norfolk 
and New Bern, serving intermediate points. It also operates Parlor 
Cars between Norfolk and New Bern, serving intermediate points, 
making direct connections at New Bern for Goldsboro and Beau- 
fort and at Norfolk with all connecting lines. 

Reduced Summer Excursion, week-end and Sunday fares to 
North Carolina resorts. For fares, reservations and information, 
apply at any Norfolk Southern Ticket Agent, or, 

J. F. Dalton 
General Passenger Agent 

NORFOLK, VA, 



Jftr^t Christian Ctjurcf) 

CORNER VANCE AND GOLDSBORO STREETS 

John Barclay, Pastor 



The church home of students and young people 
9:45 Church School 
11:00 Morning Worship 
6:30 Christian Endeavor 
7:30 Evening Worship 
7 :30 Wednesday, Prayer Service 



+ , — 




Page One Hundred Forty-nine 



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THOMAS YELVERTON CO. 

"Better Furniture" 

Funeral Directors Ambulance Service 

Call 58 We Are Never Late 



Two of the Best Things Made— 
Omega Flour and Larro Dairy Feed 

SOLD BY 

PEACOCK GROCERY CO. 

WHOLESALE GROCERS AND FOOD DEALERS 

Wilson, N. C. 



Courtesy Service 

Sell Your Tobacco With 

FERRELL WAREHOUSE CO. 

Wilson, N. C. 



Results 



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FIVE 

1 - ., 
Suits, 

! Suits 

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1 

4. 


SI 

POINTS 

Cleaned 
Pressed 


iRVICE CLEANIN( 

THOMAS W. BARNES, 

and Pressed $ .75 Hats 

.35 Ladies' 

Ladies' Silk Dress ... 


3 WORKS 

Manager 


PHONE 


885 

.75 
1.00 

+ 


Woolen Dress 
1.25 

Cash 




All Work Strictly 



Page One Hundred Fitly 












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Pine Knot 



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Young 


Mercan 

INCORPORATED 


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Co. 




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DEALERS IN DRY GOODS, CLOTHING, 
READY-TO-WEAR 

Wilson, N. C. 


SHOES, 




Up 








ROCKY MOUNT 
GREENVILLE 

4. , 


STORES AT 
KINSTON 
FARMVILLE 
MOUNT OLIVE 






TARBORO 
ENFIELD 

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AMERSON-BOSWELL COMPANY 

EXCLUSIVE 

Funeral Directors and Embalmers 
Ambulance Service 

PHONE: DAY 210 PHONES: NIGHT 571 and 1586 

J. J. ANDERSON, Manager WILSON, N. C. 



MULLIN'S BARBER SHOP 

FIRST NATIONAL BANK BUILDING 



Courtesy 



Promptness 
White Barbers 
Wilson, N. C. 



Satisfaction 



+ 



Page One Hundred Fifty-one 





















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Wii&on, J^ortf) Carolina 



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NASH AND TARBORO STREETS 

Wilson, N. C. 



WE OPERATE OVER 900 STORES 
WHERE SAVINGS ARE THE GREATEST 



■■+ 



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CREAM OF THE 
SOUTH 

SOUTHERN DAIRIES 
WILSON, N. C. 

+ 



Page One Hundred Fifty-tWO 









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G. T. FULGHUM 8 CO. 

Wilson, N. C. 



Roofing 



Sheet Metal Work 



Tobacco Flues 



+ 






We Give 10% Discount to All 
A. C. College Students 

STOKES TOMLINSON CO. 

Home of Hart, Schaffner & Marx Clothes 



i 
■■+ 









P. L. WOODARD COMPANY 

GENERAL MERCHANDISE 

General Agents Contentnea Guano Co. 

TELEPHONE 70 

Wilson, North Carolina 









« — + 



WILSON HARDWARE COMPANY 

LEADERS IN 

Hardware, Building Materials and Sporting Goods 

NASH STREET TELEPHONES 18 and 19 

Wilson, N. C. 






Page One Hundred Fifty-three 






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FARMERS COTTON OIL CO. 

Wilson, N. C. 



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Page One Hundred Fifty-four 






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foot/E are America's largest school 
annual designers and engravers 
because we render satisfaction 
on more than 400 books each 
year. Intelligent co-operation, 
highest quality workmanship 
and on-time deliveries created 
our reputation for dependability. 



JAHN & OLLIER ENGRAVING CO 

"Photographers, Artists and Makers of 
Fine Printing Plates for Black or Colors. 

817 W. Washington Boulevard « Chicago 

Telephone MONROE 7080 



We do not sub-let any 
art or engraving 





Page One Hundred Fifty-five 



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The Observer Printing House, Inc. 



'Printers of really distinctive 
Qollege a?id High School 

v/nnuals 

Charlotte, North Carolina 









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+■ — 



HUDSON - ESSEX MOTOR CARS 

The Only Two Super Sixes 

Sales and Service 
MOTOR SALES COMPANY 

108 North Douglas Street WILSON, N. C. 



Page One Hundred Fifty-six 
















Page One Hundred Fifty-seven 



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Page One Hundred Fifty-eight 









Cf)C 1928 



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The Pine Knot Staff wishes to express sin- 
cere thanks to the students and friends who have 
shared in these pages with their hearty cooper- 
ation. Also those who have contributed through 
advertising have helped greatly in making the 
efforts of this book a success. Our thanks go out 
to them. 

We have sensed a keen pleasure in trying to 
produce something that will serve in the capacity 
of refreshing memories and recalling the happy 
hours at A. C. C. We trust that this volume will 
serve you in its purpose and our efforts thus made 
a success. 



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Page One Hundred Fifty-nine 



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